The Government of China (1644-1911)

By Pao Chao Hsieh | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
CHANGES AFTER 1898

A form of government designed 3,000 years ago to meet the needs of an agricultural community1 was found, at the end of the nineteenth century, inadequate to satisfy a people who, in their attitude towards government, had grown from a stage of passive recognition to one of desire for active participation. With weaklings and minors on the throne, petticoat tyrants pulling the wires behind, adventurous eunuchs helping the pulling, ignorant and unscrupulous men in the offices, the civil service laws defunct, and the civil service examinations prostituted, the Tsing Dynasty tottered through the second half of the 19th and the first decade of the 20th century. But internal rot was not the only disease that the Manchu Dynasty had contracted. Outside of Peking and the provincial offices, the thinking portion of the people, taught either by the traditional Chinese philosophy of the superiority of the Chinese and the ultimate expulsion of the Manchus or by European ideas of nationalism, liberty and freedom, secretly and yet insistently worked for the termination of the Tartar regime. Outside of China, the powerful states of Europe and Japan, having their territorial ambitions aroused by the weakness, and their economic desire stimulated by the richness, of China, had the desire to partition the old Empire, as partition seemed the best means of attaining their political and economic ends. Both from within and without, then, the life of the Manchu Dynasty seemed unsustainable unless changes were made.

____________________
1
The fundamental features of this government and its principal organizations can be found in Chou Li, or Institutions of the Chou Dynasty. The kings of the Chou Dynasty reigned from 1122 to 255 B. C.

-343-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government of China (1644-1911)
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.