Reviving the American Dream: The Economy, the States & the Federal Government

By Alice M. Rivlin | Go to book overview

Six The Evolution of American Federalism

A theme of this book is that the federal government has taken on too much responsibility and should return some of its functions to the states. A clearer division of responsibilities between the states and the federal government could make both levels operate more effectively.

This position, however, appears to fly in the face of history. For much of the twentieth century, power has flowed toward Washington and the functions of federal and state government have become increasingly intertwined. Why did this happen? Are the reasons for the blurring of distinctions between federal and state government still valid today?


CHANGING VIEWS OF FEDERALISM

To the Founding Fathers, the division of responsibility between the states and the federal government was a crucial issue

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reviving the American Dream: The Economy, the States & the Federal Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Brookings Institution v
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • One the Dream, the Reality, and Some Solutions 1
  • Two Federal Policy Goes Global 20
  • Three Long-Term Goals for the Economy 32
  • Four Good News and Disappointment 42
  • Five What Went Wrong and What to Do About It 65
  • Six the Evolution of American Federalism 82
  • Seven Rethinking Federalism 110
  • Eight Paying for Stronger States 126
  • Nine Social Insurance: A Federal Priority 153
  • Ten Federalism Faces New Challenges 177
  • Recommended Readings 183
  • Index 188
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.