The Poetics of Fascism: Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Paul de Man

By Paul Morrison | Go to book overview

NOTES

Chapter 1
1
T. S. Eliot, After Strange Gods, ( New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1934), p. 47.
2
Perry Meisel, The Myth of the Modern: A Study of British Literature and Criticism After 1850 ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1977); Andrew Ross, The Failure of Modernism: Symptoms of American Poetry ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1986).
3
On anti-Semitism as a grotesque or perverse utopianism, see Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno, Dialectic of Enlightment, trans. John Cumming ( New York: Continuum, 1993), pp. 168-208. Jameson argues that it "is increasingly clear in today's world (if it had ever been in doubt) that a Left which cannot grasp the immense Utopian appeal of nationalism (any more than it can grasp that of religion or of fascism) can scarcely hope to 'reappropriate' such collective energies and must effectively doom itself to political impotence." Fredric Jameson, The Political Unconscious: Narrative as a Socially Symbolic Act ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1981), p. 298. Eliot and Pound stand as testimony to the immense utopian appeal of religion and fascism, respectively.
4
Gilbert Allardyce, "What Fascism Is Not: Thoughts on the Definition of a Concept", American Historical Review 84, no. 2 ( April 1979): 367-88.
5
Stanley G. Payne, Fascism: Comparison and Definition ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1980), p. 4.
6
Ernst Nolte, Three Faces of Fascism: Action Française, Italian Fascism, National Socialism, trans. Leila Vennewitz ( New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1966); hereafter cited by page in the text.
7
Geoffrey H. Hartman, Criticism in the Wilderness: The Study of Literature Today ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980), p. 100.

-147-

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The Poetics of Fascism: Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Paul de Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Modernism (for the Other People) 3
  • 2 - Ezra Pound the Poetics of Money 16
  • 3 - T. S. Eliot the Poetics of Failure 60
  • 4 - Paul De Man the Poetics of Collaboration 109
  • Notes 147
  • Index 171
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