Lucian, Satirist and Artist

By Francis G. Allinson | Go to book overview

NOTES

Grateful acknowledgment of indebtedness for various helpful references is made to Dr. G. Alder Blumer; to Professors J. C. Adams of Yale, Jos. Jastrow of Wisconsin, A. Trowbridge of Princeton; to Director L. E. Rowe of the R. I. School of Design; to the author's colleagues: ProfessorsClough, Crowell, Hastings, Koopman, and R. M. Mitchell; and also to Professor G. H. Chase and the Fogg Museum, Harvard, and Director B. H. Hill of Athens and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts for their courtesies in obtaining the illustrations. Also to Messrs. Ginn and Co. for permission to use matter in Allinson Lucian (College Series of Greek Authors).

1
For a different emphasis see the able article "Lucian the Sophist", by Emily J. Putnam, in Classical Philology, iv. 162-177 ( 1909).
2
Cf. M. Croiset, La Vie et les Oeuvres de Lucien, Paris, 1882, p. 390.
3
Op. cit., p. 393. For detailed illustration of Lucian's influence see below, Chapter VIII, pp. 130-187.
4
Cf. A. D. Fraser, "The Age of the Extant Columns of the Olympieium at Athens", in Art Bulletin, iv. ( 1921). The temple, newly oriented on the Pisistratus site, was begun by Antiochus Epiphanes but left unfinished at his death in 1964 B.C. and finished and dedicated by Hadrian in 131 A.D.
5
Only as a very recherché piece of satire could this be assigned to Lucian.
6
Cf. Franz Cumont, After Life in Roman Paganism, New Haven and London, 1922, p. 17et passim. See, also, his Astrology and Religion among the Greeks and Romans, New York and London, 1912, p. 53: "It is to their (i.e., the Greeks') everlasting honour that, amid the tangle of precise observations and superstitious fancies which made

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Lucian, Satirist and Artist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I- Credentials for The Twentieth Century 3
  • Ii. Age of the Antonines 14
  • Iii. Life of Lucian 24
  • IV- Extant Writings: Form And Content 37
  • V. Philosophy and Ethics 47
  • Vi. the Supernatural 65
  • VII- Other Dramatic Dialogues: Polemics 100
  • VIII- Lucian's Creditors And Debtors 121
  • Notes 191
  • Condensed Bibliography 203
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