Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Males

By Freeman A. Hrabowski III; Kenneth I. Maton et al. | Go to book overview
providing the protective umbrella of African culture. They also clearly appreciate their sons, accomplishments. The mothers are keenly aware of society's dangers, of how few Black males "make it," and that their sons have been fortunate enough to be among the few who have.
Summary
Based on what we learned from the mothers about how they raised their sons to handle the nonacademic aspects of their lives, we can provide a brief summary. Although the mothers were asked the same questions as the fathers, their answers varied somewhat.It is important to note that we gained a number of impressions about the mothers' relationships with their sons. They more than the fathers seemed to do things for their sons, while fathers either did things with their sons or offered advice from the sidelines. This is consistent with the adage "Mothers raise their daughters but love their sons." The mothers seemed very involved in their sons' lives. This may be a prerequisite for good child-rearing. But they also stood aside when they felt the father, or another man, could be helpful.Compared with the fathers, the mothers placed greater emphasis on nurturing and less emphasis on disciplining and on the extent to which their sons have to deal with life's unfairness. It also appears that the mothers told fewer stories to their sons; instead, the emphasis was on open communication. The mothers appear to "do" while fathers appear to teach.
1. Develop a broad philosophy of life. The mothers described their efforts to create an atmosphere at home where values were discussed. This is part of a preparatory stage that the mothers see as important to handle the ups and downs of life.
2. Develop a relationship that encourages open discussion of issues. Mothers emphasized their ability to talk to their sons about key issues in their lives in a nonjudgmental way. At the same time, it was clear that they conveyed definite values. This is a difficult balance to strike for any parent but one that is key if communication channels are to stay open between a parent and child.
3. Teach specific ways of handling situations that arise. Mothers taught their children what situations to avoid, as well as what to do when such problems arise as drugs being offered or fights being started.
4. Talk about race-related matters. Mothers, like fathers, had many concerns about the situation of African American males and taught

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Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Males
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Successful African American Males and Their Families 3
  • 2 - Father-Son Relationships: The Father's Voice 23
  • Summary 57
  • 3 - Mother-Son Relationships: The Mother's Voice 62
  • Summary 95
  • 4 - The Son's Perspective 101
  • Summary 137
  • 5 - Parenting and Educating for Success in Math and Science: from Early Childhood to College 148
  • Summary 166
  • Summary 170
  • Summary 184
  • Summary 187
  • 6 - Parenting African American Males for the Twenty-First Century: What We Have Learned 188
  • Appendix a Overview of Study Procedure 206
  • Appendix B National Science Foundation Minority Student Development Programs 209
  • Notes 211
  • References 227
  • Index 237
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