Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Males

By Freeman A. Hrabowski III; Kenneth I. Maton et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix B
National Science Foundation Minority Student Development Programs

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is the major funding agency for science and mathematics education in the United States. The NSF also coordinates programs promoting science, math, and technology with other federal and state agencies. These programs focus on all levels of education, from preschool to graduate school and beyond. Many of the science and math programs the sons in this book participated in are, at least partially, funded by the NSF. The National Science Foundation annually documents the number of science and mathematics degrees awarded to minority students as part of their stated goal of increasing the numbers of minorities in science and mathematics.

NSF student development programs are grouped into three areas of focus: precollege, undergraduate, and graduate.

Precollege opportunities, aimed at elementary- and secondary-school students, are grouped under Career Access Opportunities in Science and Technology (CAO). The three programs supported under this initiative are Comprehensive Regional Centers for Minorities (CRCM), Summer Science Camps (SSC), and Partnerships for Minority Student Achievement (PMSA). All three programs aim to forge alliances between schools, institutions of higher education, community organizations, and private industry both to foster minority student interest in science, math, and technology and to increase minority performance in these fields.

Undergraduate programs provide outreach assistance and scholarships to increase the number of degrees awarded to minorities in science, math, and technology. The two programs supported under this initiative are the Alliance for Minority Participation (AMP) program and the Research Careers for Alinority Scholars (RCMS) program. The

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Beating the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Males
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Successful African American Males and Their Families 3
  • 2 - Father-Son Relationships: The Father's Voice 23
  • Summary 57
  • 3 - Mother-Son Relationships: The Mother's Voice 62
  • Summary 95
  • 4 - The Son's Perspective 101
  • Summary 137
  • 5 - Parenting and Educating for Success in Math and Science: from Early Childhood to College 148
  • Summary 166
  • Summary 170
  • Summary 184
  • Summary 187
  • 6 - Parenting African American Males for the Twenty-First Century: What We Have Learned 188
  • Appendix a Overview of Study Procedure 206
  • Appendix B National Science Foundation Minority Student Development Programs 209
  • Notes 211
  • References 227
  • Index 237
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