Consuming Angels: Advertising and Victorian Women

By Lori Anne Loeb | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
Implicitly, this is a study of Victorian consumerism, although the term itself may be more obfuscating than helpful. The term consumerism was coined in the 1950s. It was first used by Vance Packard to refer to advertising strategies that promoted planned obsolescence and combatted a saturated market. In the 1960s it was adopted by Ralph Nader and became synonymous with the consumer protection movement. In academic context, however, it usually refers to a social movement from an ethos of production to an ethos of consumption, from a cultural emphasis on work, sacrifice, and saving to a cultural emphasis on leisure, self- gratification, and self-realization. See Paul N. Bloom and Ruth Belk Smith, The Future of Consumerism ( Toronto: Lexington Books, 1986).
2.
Walter Houghton, The Victorian Frame of Mind ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1957).
3.
Patricia Branca, Silent Sisterhood ( London: Croom Helm, 1975).
4.
J. A. Banks, Prosperity and Parenthood ( London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1954).
5.
T. Schlereth, Material Culture: A Research Guide ( Lawrence: University of Kansas, 1968).
6.
Simon Jervis, Victorian Furniture ( London: Ward Lock, 1968); Geoffrey Wills , Victorian Glass ( London: G. Bell, 1976); Nicholas Cooper, The Opulent Eye ( London: Architectural Press, 1977); Nicholas Pevsner, High Victorian Design ( London: Architectural Press, 1951).
7.
Harold Perkin asserts that "consumer demand was the ultimate key to the industrial revolution." See Origins of Modern English Society ( London: Routledge, 1969), p. 91. But the only major work to focus on demand, Neil McKendrick and J. Plumb, The Birth of a Consumer Society ( London: Europa Publications, 1982), champions a Veblenesque perspective that does not adequately address the independent vitality of the middle class.
8.
Henry Sampson, A History of Advertising from Earliest Times ( London: Chatto & Windus, 1874); Frank Presbrey, History and Development of Advertising ( Garden

-185-

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