Jesus in History and Myth

By R. Joseph Hoffmann; Gerald A. Larue | Go to book overview

George E. Mendenhall


The Palestinian Grass-roots Origins of New Testament Christology

W. Lambert has observed that we know next to nothing about the submerged 80 percent of the population of ancient Assyria and Babylonia. To that we can certainly add ancient Egypt and Canaan. One of my colleagues in the classics department years ago announced to my surprise a graduate seminar on Roman popular religion. When I asked him why he didn't offer it as an undergraduate course his response was, "I don't know enough about the subject."

These observations drawn from recent cultural phenomena certainly justify the conclusion that we are dealing with a polarization that is a constant in complex societies, but little attention has been paid to the historical constancy, probably because scholars unconsciously identify with the ancient population groups who produced the written materials that constitute their metier, and have never had firsthand experience of village life; or if they had, they have been eager to forget it as soon as possible. Except for the thousands of pre-Islamic Arabic inscriptions, virtually all of our excavated written sources stem from the elites of political, business, and priestly specializations. We can easily see from the condescending dismissal of the prophet Amos by the priest of Bethel that such elites had little regard for the country-bumpkin upstarts who presumed to preach to them. Indeed, such preaching was doubtless received with the same attitude illustrated in one dictionary definition of preaching: "the giving of unwanted advice in an offensive manner."

The Bible seems so strange and foreign to most of the modern political and educated elites in part simply because much of it, and the mainstream

____________________
George E. Mendenhall is Professor of Ancient and Biblical Studies at the University of Michigan.

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jesus in History and Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 217

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.