The Faces of Reason: An Essay on Philosophy and Culture in English Canada, 1850-1950

By Leslie Armour; Elizabeth Trott | Go to book overview

SEVEN
REASON AS SOCIAL UNDERSTANDING

John Watson--Part I

WHEN JOHN WATSON came to Queen's in 1872, he was twenty- five years old. Queen's (only six years older than Watson) was a clearing in the woods by the lake. Watson remarked that its builders had taken seriously Aristotle's definition of a building--four walls and a roof. But Queen's had already had one remarkable philosopher, John Clark Murray, on its staff and a number of highly entertaining ones as well.

The fulsome praise which Edward Caird had lavished on the young Watson in his letters of recommendation must have aroused a certain amount of scepticism in Kingston. But Caird's estimates turned out to be true. Watson was to go on to become a Gifford lecturer (even now, the highest honour which can befall a philosopher in the English-speaking world) and was eventually to be matched against Josiah Royce in a famous series of lectures at Berkeley. Caird never changed his mind either. " Watson," he wrote later "is perhaps a man of the 'driest light' that I know. I do not know anyone who sees his way more clearly through any philosophical entanglements."1

Canada, in its contemporary form, was, of course, still younger than Watson and Queen's. Watson was to exercise an important influence on the country. Young men went out from Queen's to man the growing civil service, Presbyterian churches across the country, and the newer universities in the west. For more than fifty years, Watson was a dominant--sometimes the dominant influence--at Queen's. He played a significant role in the intellectual background and even in some of the practical negotiations which led to the United Church of Canada. His pupils seem to have carried with them an echo of that dry voice and its persistent demand for reasonableness and it often stayed with them for life.

____________________
1
Robert Charles Wallace, ed., Some Great Men of Queen's ( Toronto: Ryerson Press, 1941), p. 24.

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Faces of Reason: An Essay on Philosophy and Culture in English Canada, 1850-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.