The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1

By William Cullen Bryant; William Cullen Bryant II et al. | Go to book overview

We do not like the Treasury Report here--or at least that part of it which relates to the tariff. McLane's recommendations are much of a piece with the suggestions of Mr. Clay in the Richmond Whig. McLane is just where he was when he went to England--the majority of the nation I believe is ahead of him. --The story of the American System in his report is absolutely offensive. I give him credit for honesty and frankness--but I do not believe he has thought of the subject for several years past. 2

Yrs truly
W. C. BRYANT.

MANUSCRIPT: NYPL-Berg ADDRESS: Hon. G. C. Verplanck / Member of Congress Washington / D. C. POSTMARK: NEW-YORK / DEC / [10?] POSTAL ANNOTATION: FREE DOCKETED: W. C. Bryant.

1.
In the fall of 1831 the young and energetic firm of J. & J. Harper agreed to publish a work of fiction by The Talisman's authors and others. Bryant and Sands enlisted the help of William Leggett and James Kirke Paulding, whose books the firm had issued, and of Catharine Sedgwick, who wrote Bryant on December 6 that she would gladly participate, though frightened at appearing in such "elect company." NYPL-Berg. With Verplanck, these authors were to prepare equally a volume of tales to be called "The Hexade." When Verplanck failed to make good his share, the other five produced Tales of Glauber-Spa, in two volumes ( New York, 1832). Bryant contributions were "The Skeleton's Cave" ( 1, 193-242) and "Medfield" ( 1, 243-276).
2.
In the reorganization of Jackson's cabinet in 1831 Louis McLane was brought home from his post as minister to England to succeed Samuel D. Ingham as Secretary of the Treasury. "As Clay himself used the term, his American system was the opposite of what he was wont to refer to as the 'colonial' or 'foreign' system of free trade. It meant, basically, the use of the protective tariff to build up American industry." Van Deusen, Jacksonian Era, pp. 46, 51. The Richmond Whig, founded and edited by John H. Pleasants, was the only effective opponent in Virginia of the powerful pro- Jackson Richmond Enquirer, conducted by Thomas Ritchie. See Mott, American Journalism, p. 189.

227. To Gulian C. Verplanck

New York Dec 26 1831.

My dear Sir.

I shall probably set out for Washington about the middle of the month, and shall be happy to attend to any commission you may think fit to entrust to me. Col. Wetmore will probably come on with me. 1

Your share of the "book" will of course be between 80 and 90 pages as the volume will consist of 500. I am sorry you have not the prospect of more leisure--but you must write something, or the Harper's will not have the book. They bargained for it on the express condition that all the persons named should contribute. So you are pledged. 2 You say nothing about the Treasury Report. I take the liberty of imagining that it did not come up to what you expected--at all events it was much short of what I was prepared to expect from Mr. McLane. What he proposes, as conces-

-310-

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The Letters of William Cullen Bryant - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Key to Manuscript Sources Often Cited in FootNotes vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Editorial Plan 4
  • Bryant Chronology 1794-1836 6
  • Bryant''s Correspondents 1809-1836 9
  • I- Student of Life and the Law 1809-1815 (letters 1 To 33) 17
  • 2- To Austin Bryant 20
  • 2- To Austin Bryant 21
  • 2- To Austin Bryant 23
  • 5- To John Avery 25
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 27
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 28
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 30
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 31
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 32
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 33
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 35
  • 6- To Jacob Porter 36
  • 14- To William Baylies 38
  • 15- To Peter Bryant 39
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 41
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 42
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 43
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 44
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 45
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 46
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 47
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 48
  • 16- To Elisha Hubbard 49
  • 25- To Austin Bryant 50
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 52
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 53
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 54
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 56
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 57
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 58
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 59
  • 26- To Peter Bryant 60
  • II- Following Two Professions 1816-1821 (letters 34 To 80) 62
  • 35- To William Baylies 65
  • 35- To William Baylies 66
  • 35- To William Baylies 67
  • 35- To William Baylies 68
  • 39- To Peter Bryant 70
  • 40- To William Baylies 71
  • 41- To Peter Bryant 72
  • 42- To Miss Sarah S. Bryant 72
  • 43- To Frances Fairchild 74
  • 44- To Willard Phillips 75
  • 44- To Willard Phillips 76
  • 44- To Willard Phillips 77
  • 44- To Willard Phillips 78
  • 48- To Peter Bryant 80
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 81
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 82
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 83
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 84
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 86
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 88
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 89
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 90
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 92
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 93
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 94
  • 49- To Willard Phillips 94
  • 63- To Henry D. Sewall 96
  • 64- To Mrs. Sarah S. Bryant 97
  • 65- To Miss Sarah S. Bryant 98
  • 66- To Henry D. Sewall 102
  • 67- To Miss Sarah S. Bryant 103
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 103
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 104
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 105
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 106
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 107
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 110
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 110
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 112
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 113
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 113
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 114
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 116
  • 68- To.William J. Spooner 117
  • III- The Roads Diverge 1822-1825 (letters 81 To 127) 121
  • 82- To Richard H. Dana 124
  • 82- To Richard H. Dana 126
  • 82- To Richard H. Dana 128
  • 82- To Richard H. Dana 131
  • 82- To Richard H. Dana 133
  • 87- To Charles Sedgwick and Others 136
  • 88- To Charles Sedgwick 136
  • 89- To Charles Webster, Editor, Berkshire Star 138
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 141
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 146
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 147
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 148
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 149
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 151
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 152
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 153
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 153
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 154
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 155
  • 90- To Andrews Norton 156
  • 103- To Richard H. Dana 157
  • 104- To Charles Sedgwick 159
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 160
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 161
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 162
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 162
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 162
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 164
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 165
  • 105- To Willard Phillips 165
  • 113- To Jared Sparks 166
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 166
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 167
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 168
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 169
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 170
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 171
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 171
  • 114- To Charles Sedgwick 172
  • 122- To Frances F. Bryant 173
  • 123- To Frances F. Bryant 174
  • 123- To Frances F. Bryant 175
  • 123- To Frances F. Bryant 175
  • 123- To Frances F. Bryant 177
  • 127- To Frances F. Bryant 179
  • IV- Sitting in Judgment 1825-1827 (letters 128 To 194) 181
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 184
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 185
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 186
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 188
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 190
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 192
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 193
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 194
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 195
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 197
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 198
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 199
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 200
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 200
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 202
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 203
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 206
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 209
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 211
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 211
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 212
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 213
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 213
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 215
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 216
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 217
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 219
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 221
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 222
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 223
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 226
  • 129- To Richard H. Dana 227
  • 161- To Charles Folsom 229
  • 162- To Charles Folsom 229
  • 162- To Charles Folsom 230
  • 162- To Charles Folsom 231
  • 162- To Charles Folsom 231
  • 66.To Charles Folsom 234
  • 167- To Charles Folsom 238
  • 168- To Charles Folsom 238
  • 169- To Charles Folsom 238
  • 169- To Charles Folsom 239
  • 169- To Charles Folsom 239
  • 169- To Charles Folsom 240
  • 173- To Richard H. Dana 241
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 242
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 243
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 244
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 244
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 245
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 246
  • 174- To Charles Folsom 247
  • 181- To Charles Folsom 249
  • 182- To Frances F. Bryant 249
  • 183- To Richard H. Dana 250
  • 184- To Charles Folsom 251
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 251
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 252
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 252
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 253
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 253
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 254
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 255
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 255
  • 185- To Frances F. Bryant 256
  • V- Fellow in the Arts 1828-1831 (letters 195 To 222) 260
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 263
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 265
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 265
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 267
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 268
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 269
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 270
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 270
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 273
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 275
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 277
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 279
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 279
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 279
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 282
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 283
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 284
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 286
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 289
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 290
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 291
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 292
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 293
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 294
  • 196- To Gulian C. Verplanck 295
  • 221- To Mrs. Sarah S. Bryant 297
  • 222- To the Readers of the Evening Post 299
  • VI- Journalist, Poet, Traveler 1831-1834 (letters 223 To 287) 304
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 307
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 308
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 309
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 310
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 311
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 311
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 313
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 315
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 317
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 319
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 321
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 322
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 323
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 326
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 327
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 327
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 328
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 329
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 333
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 336
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 341
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 345
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 350
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 355
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 359
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 361
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 362
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 364
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 364
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 365
  • 224- To Frances F. Bryant 365
  • 256- To Gulian C. Verplanck 367
  • 257- To Gulian C. Verplanck 367
  • 257- To Gulian C. Verplanck 368
  • 257- To Gulian C. Verplanck 369
  • 260- To Mrs. Sarah S. Bryant 370
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 373
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 374
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 375
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 375
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 376
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 377
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 379
  • 261- To Gulian C. Verplanck 380
  • 269- To Richard H. Dana 382
  • 270- To Richard H. Dana 383
  • 271- To Richard H. Dana 384
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 386
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 389
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 389
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 391
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 391
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 393
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 394
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 395
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 396
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 399
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 400
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 403
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 404
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 404
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 406
  • 272- To John Howard Bryant 407
  • VII- Proud Old World 1834-1836 (letters 288 To 314) 409
  • 289- To John Rand 413
  • 289- To John Rand 415
  • 289- To John Rand 418
  • 289- To John Rand 419
  • 289- To John Rand 423
  • 289- To John Rand 427
  • 289- To John Rand 428
  • 289- To John Rand 430
  • 289- To John Rand 433
  • 289- To John Rand 435
  • 289- To John Rand 439
  • 289- To John Rand 442
  • 289- To John Rand 445
  • 289- To John Rand 446
  • 289- To John Rand 449
  • 304- To William Leggett 451
  • 305- To Susan Renner 457
  • 306- To Julia Sands 460
  • 307- To William Ware 465
  • 308- To William Leggett 472
  • 309- To Susan Renner 473
  • 309- To Susan Renner 475
  • 309- To Susan Renner 477
  • 309- To Susan Renner 479
  • 309- To Susan Renner 483
  • 309- To Susan Renner 485
  • Abbreviations and Short Titles 487
  • Index 491
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