The Jew through the Centuries

By Herbert L. Willett | Go to book overview

III HEBREW CONTACTS, ACCRETIONS AND DISPERSIONS

About the time that Hebrew clans were finding a place of settlement in Canaan, another people, the Philistines, were taking possession of the maritime plain in the south-west portion of the same country.1 The Old Testament writers speak of them as coming from Caphtor, which has been supposed to refer either to the island of Crete or to the southwestern coastland of Asia Minor. They are indeed called Caphtorites by the Deuteronomist, by Amos and Jeremiah; and in many places they are spoken of as Cherethites. The combined name Cherethites-Pelethites has often been equated with Cretans-Philistines, as implying their western and island origin.2 A favorable view is taken in many quarters of the theory that Hellenic tribes from the north moved down upon Crete overthrowing the Minoan civilization and accomplishing the tragedy of Knossos.3 According to this theory Cretans fled south-eastward across the sea toward Egypt, or the marauders themselves may have taken that pursuing course. About the same period similar western Hellenic hordes swept down upon the Hittite peoples of central Asia Minor and crushed them. Refugees from one or both of these waves of conquest traveling both by land and

____________________
1
1 Sam. 4:1.
2
Deut. 2:23; 1 Sam. 30:14, 16; Amos 9:7; Jer. 47:4; Zeph. 2:4, 5.
3
Baikie, The Amarna Age, p. 179.

-87-

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The Jew through the Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • I- Palestine 23
  • II- Hebrew Origins 71
  • III- Hebrew Contacts, Accretions And Dispersions 87
  • IV- Decline and Fall of Judah: Close Of Hebrew History 104
  • V- The Rise of Judaism 132
  • VI- Priesthood and Genealogies 166
  • VII- The Growth of Judaism 189
  • VIII- Jew and Christian 224
  • IX- The End of the Jewish State 258
  • X- The Jew Through the Centuries 279
  • XI- The Rise of Zionism 314
  • XII- Jew and Arab in Palestine 344
  • XIII- The Jew Today and Tomorrow 382
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 415
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