The Jew through the Centuries

By Herbert L. Willett | Go to book overview

XI THE RISE OF ZIONISM

There has been no period since the beginnings of Judaism in the days of Nehemiah and Ezra in which Jews have not been living in Palestine. In spite of all proscriptive edicts made by Romans, Arabs, crusaders and Turks, members of that race have remained on the soil. In many instances it has been in the face of severe repression and prohibition. There was no police power adequate to the complete execution of any mandate of expulsion. The fact that permission was given by Titus for the continuance of a Jewish school in Jamnia opened the way for other centers, such as those at Sepphoris, Tiberias and Safed and in other parts of the country. Jews in small groups or in family units remained out of sheer love for the land, or the sentiment of despair in the effort to visualize any other home. Usually the attempts to rid the country of this people came in spasms of resentment or nationalistic zeal on the part of the controlling nations, and in the intervals the Jewish exiles crept back to their former homes, or struck fresh roots into the beloved soil. It was never possible actually to banish Judaism from Palestine.

Meantime in Jewish minds both in the holy land and elsewhere the tradition continued and strengthened that the country had once been the unquestioned possession of the Jew, and that in some continuing sense, in spite of other and

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The Jew through the Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • I- Palestine 23
  • II- Hebrew Origins 71
  • III- Hebrew Contacts, Accretions And Dispersions 87
  • IV- Decline and Fall of Judah: Close Of Hebrew History 104
  • V- The Rise of Judaism 132
  • VI- Priesthood and Genealogies 166
  • VII- The Growth of Judaism 189
  • VIII- Jew and Christian 224
  • IX- The End of the Jewish State 258
  • X- The Jew Through the Centuries 279
  • XI- The Rise of Zionism 314
  • XII- Jew and Arab in Palestine 344
  • XIII- The Jew Today and Tomorrow 382
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 415
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