The Jew through the Centuries

By Herbert L. Willett | Go to book overview

XIII THE JEW TODAY AND TOMORROW

Of no other race is the world so conscious as of the Jews. They are the universal people, found in almost every land, and marked by characteristics which draw the attention of those among whom they live. These are sometimes marks of a physical type, but more frequently mannerisms and forms of speech. There are other racial groups which are more distinctively recognized in certain parts of the world, and in a measure set apart either by popular approval or dislike, as in the case of orientals on the Pacific coast, or Negroes in portions of the United States, or the nationals of any country that has been the victim of war prejudice, like the Japanese in China, the Americans in Europe in the days of the Spanish War, or the Germans in any of the allied lands.

But the Jew is recognized wherever he goes. This recognition is sometimes friendly and sometimes hostile, but it tends to be universal. In some instances the Jew is proud of the place he holds in the world's regard, whether it is that of approval or of dislike, and sometimes he is deeply sensitive to the sentiment of aversion which many of his people excite. In the latter instances he may attempt to hide his racial status by change of name or by taking refuge in non- Jewish groups into which he is able to gain admission, or he may be indifferent to other than Jewish opinion, finding ample compensation in the consciousness of his history and

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The Jew through the Centuries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • I- Palestine 23
  • II- Hebrew Origins 71
  • III- Hebrew Contacts, Accretions And Dispersions 87
  • IV- Decline and Fall of Judah: Close Of Hebrew History 104
  • V- The Rise of Judaism 132
  • VI- Priesthood and Genealogies 166
  • VII- The Growth of Judaism 189
  • VIII- Jew and Christian 224
  • IX- The End of the Jewish State 258
  • X- The Jew Through the Centuries 279
  • XI- The Rise of Zionism 314
  • XII- Jew and Arab in Palestine 344
  • XIII- The Jew Today and Tomorrow 382
  • Bibliography 407
  • Index 415
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