IX

SCULPTURE, IN THE past few decades, has progressed in tremendous strides. It has been the good fortune of Epstein to have lived in a period so fruitful and to which he could contribute so much. If we consider that Epstein's own life has spanned the range of sculpture from the romantic impressionism of Rodin to the abstract expressionism of Brancusi, we begin to see the truly unique nature of this period. And this remarkable advance was due in large part to the efforts of a small group of men--and prominent among this group was Jacob Epstein.

There has been much speculation as to the probable nature of Epstein's influence had he chosen to remain and work in America. On the whole the results would have been largely the same.

It was inevitable that Epstein and his contemporaries should react to and be influenced by the newly recognized values of primitive art. This art--the product of the African wood carver or the stone carving of an early Egyptian --had within itself the elements for which men of Epstein's caliber were seeking. There was to be found in these works all of the essential qualities which had been so profoundly ignored by European and American sculptors of the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century. These qualities--a respect for materials, the recognition of an essentially sculptural form and the patient appreciation of the true problems of craftsmanship, all found an eager and receptive audience in Epstein and a handful of his contemporaries.

Modern sculpture, as a result, is blossoming in both England and America. The new vision of sculpture is not a romantic but a dynamic one. It is a vision of beauty but a practical form of beauty which will function as a true expression of its time and purpose.

It is to this new vision that Epstein has made his great contribution. One could dissect Epstein's work and point out where his bronze pieces have influenced portraiture, where his stone work has influenced direct carving, etc. And while all of this might very well be true, it would not give us a true picture of Epstein. His work has been far too homogeneous to allow of a divided appraisal. No matter what the form, portraiture, direct carving, or architectural sculpture, all of his work drives toward a necessary conclusion --the creation of a sculpture which will be a practical, aesthetic, and essential part of living.

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Jacob Epstein
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Plates vii
  • Foreword xi
  • I 1
  • II 4
  • III 7
  • IV 11
  • V 14
  • VI 19
  • VII 23
  • VIII 27
  • IX 29
  • The Sculptures 33
  • The Drawings 183
  • Catalogue of the Works of Jacob Epstein 227
  • Index 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.