Roman Numerals, Typographic Leaves and Pointing Hands: Some Notes on Their Origin, History, and Contemporary Use

By Paul McPharlin | Go to book overview

Some Notes on Contributors

PAUL McPHARLIN was born in Detroit, thirty-eight years ago. He began drawing at three, "first efforts revealing a direct, linear style with abstract, even surrealist qualities. More mature efforts never recaptured this vigor." He began writing pretty early, too. The first ten years of typewriter-pecking produced essays, poetry and short stories in quantity. Plays and novels followed in the next five, and, he maintains, "there has been a slowing down latterly." This, however, is pure fiction -- witness his recent contributions to The Dolphin, No. 4, Parts I, II and III, including the editing of the "Byways of Bookmaking" department, signed Dr. Culrarity; witness his founding and editing of The Fine Book Letter and his publications under the imprint of The Fine Book Circle since 1936.

He went to school in Detroit, Washington and New York; to Columbia College, Wayne University, and the University of Michigan (Ph.D. in Fine Arts); to the Chicago Art Institute and the Art Students League, New York.

Chief work? Puppetry! He helped found The Puppeteers of America, serves as its publications editor, and has published twenty-four books and almost as many pamphlets on that subject. He directed a professional puppet company for ten years, producing Shakespeare, Fielding and "minor playwrights, including McPharlin." In ninety days, during the Spring of 1938, he saw ninety puppet shows in Europe.

He designed pewter ware and a chain of candy stores in Chicago, furniture and fabrics in Detroit, and drew advertisements for three months in Cleveland. His three fist designs are shown on page 74. At present he is W.P.A. state supervisor of the Michigan Art and Craft Project.

Previous Typophile contributions: Left To Their Own Devices, 1937.

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Roman Numerals, Typographic Leaves and Pointing Hands: Some Notes on Their Origin, History, and Contemporary Use
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Uses of the Roman Numeral 3
  • Roman Pointing and Ivy Leaves 24
  • The Pointing Hand 47
  • Appendix - Printers' "Ivy Leaves" 77
  • Some Notes on Contributors 81
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