Introduction to the Psychoanalysis of Mallarme

By Charles Mauron; Will L. McLendon et al. | Go to book overview

4
Anxiety This Midnight

PRELIMINARY NOTE

MY AIM in the first part of this book was to clear the ground and give the reader, through the use of concrete example, the general directions he would need. So in chapter 1 our thesis emerged from the comparison of certain basic texts. In chapter 2, which was devoted to the work of Dr. Fretet, I criticized his diagnosis as far too simple for our taste in that it failed to give a detailed enough psychological explanation for Mallarmé's behavior, or for his work. In chapter 3, finally, I tried to test my own hypothesis in the light of the facts of the crucial period between Mallarmé's fifteenth and twenty-second year, when the poet's spiritual and temporal destiny were settled.

After this analysis, it would seem natural to use a chronological order for the rest of the book. But as soon as we try it we run into difficulties. Of course, Mallarmé's development can be schematized. Thus, we would establish the period 1862-1868 as one of anxiety. Ideas of absolute thought and death became more and more closely associated. His metaphysical crisis sprang from his work on Hérodiade and threatened to become very serious after his Besançon stay. A second period would begin in the summer of 1868 with the composition of his Sonnet en YX and would go on through Igitur and Toast fun+bre to the relatively happy Paris

-111-

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Introduction to the Psychoanalysis of Mallarme
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction To The American Edition 1
  • 1 - Maria Mallarme 23
  • 2 - Poetic Alienation 53
  • 3 - Before Hérodiade 81
  • 4 - Anxiety This Midnight 111
  • 5 - The Prisoner. 150
  • 6 - The Spectator 167
  • 7 - Orpheus 193
  • 8 - From the Youthful Poems To the Livre 217
  • Notes 251
  • Index 273
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