Introduction to the Psychoanalysis of Mallarme

By Charles Mauron; Will L. McLendon et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.
1. Chapter 8 is a new chapter, added to the American edition. [Trans. note.]
2. ( Paris: Denoël, 1941). [Trans. note.]
3. Henri Mondor, Vie de Mallarmé ( Paris: Gallimard, 1941).
4. Cf. Mine Adile Ayda, Le Drame intérieur de Mallarmé, (Istanbul: Edition La Turquie Moderne, 1955), p. 232:

"But it is the critic André Rousseaux who, in his article "Mallarmé tel qu'en lui-même", has most magnificently defined the attitude of Mallarmé to women:

'. . . His taste on the one hand for ambiguous forms of chastity, fierce, intangible but naked and very close to desire, precisely the chastity of a Hérodiade; on the other hand for beloveds who have turned maternal and to whom one can "whisper" the name "sister." This ambiguity constitutes in fact a magnificent keyboard passing from the most carnal sensuality to the most subtle ideality' ( André Rousseaux , Le Monde classique, Vol. II, Albin Michel, Paris, 1946)." [The passage is identical with the one given above in Mauron's preface dated 1941. -- Trans. note.]

5. I call personal myth (or fundamental myth) in psychocriticism the obsessive and hence constant fantasy which appears when one superposes the works of an author. Cf. [ Charles Mauron] L'Inconscient dans l'oeuvre et la vie de Racine,Annales de la Faculté des Lettres d'Aix-en-Provence ( 1957), and "La Méthode psychocritique", Orbis Litterarum ( Copenhagen, 1958).
6. W. Ronald Fairbairn, Psychoanalytic Studies of the Personality ( London: Tavistock Publ., Ltd., 1953). [Trans. note.]
7. Narration française à sujet libre, written by Mallarmé as a normal exercise in the fourth or fifth year of the lycée -- hereafter referred to as the "free composition."
8. . . . This tale is of the poet's seraphic period. All the religious fervor that his grandmother, Madame Desmolins, had inspired in him was still intact.

"Provided one does not read these pages with sarcasm at finding

-251-

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Introduction to the Psychoanalysis of Mallarme
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction To The American Edition 1
  • 1 - Maria Mallarme 23
  • 2 - Poetic Alienation 53
  • 3 - Before Hérodiade 81
  • 4 - Anxiety This Midnight 111
  • 5 - The Prisoner. 150
  • 6 - The Spectator 167
  • 7 - Orpheus 193
  • 8 - From the Youthful Poems To the Livre 217
  • Notes 251
  • Index 273
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