Sex Is Not a Natural Act and Other Essays

By Leonore Tiefer | Go to book overview

22
Sex Is Not a Natural Act: The Next Phase

The astute reader will have noticed that issues of race and ethnicity have rarely been mentioned in these essays. I should say that the nonwhite reader will have noticed--white readers do not often seem to notice such omissions, and therein lies both the problem and its solution ( Spelman, 1988). Nor have I dwelt on real-world differences other than gender--nationality, age, able-bodiedness, sexual orientation, and so on. These omissions will doubtlessly have been noticed mostly by nonheterosexuals, people with disabilities, and others who are aware of "difference" from their own experiences.

As a white, heterosexual, able-bodied, American-born feminist, I, not surprisingly, have focused in my writing on correcting the errors of omission and commission in sexology that pertained to "women." I have argued that these errors could not be corrected by a few deft changes here and there but would require transformation of the concepts and categories sexologists use to understand what kind of thing sexuality is ( Tiefer, 1991a). Such a transformation would take into account the experiences and perspectives of "women."

Of course, at some level I knew that "women" were not all of a kind and did not necessarily have the same sexual interests. Yet it did not occur to me that differences among women were so important as to undermine gender generalizations. Both my work in urology departments and feminist reading supported my impression that there were important issues stressed by many women that were not represented anywhere in sexology, and I took it on myself to expose some of the resistances to recognizing women's perspectives. Rereading all these chapters as I prepared this book has left me feeling that this effort was worthwhile but grievously incomplete. An understanding of sexuality and of sexology must not only address "women's" issues but must also address other issues of social difference, such as race and class, and must show how one's specific cultural background--the fact that one is a white woman or an African-American woman, for example--will have

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sex Is Not a Natural Act and Other Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.