Sex Is Not a Natural Act and Other Essays

By Leonore Tiefer | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
These letters were written years before the risk of HIV transmission had inspired "safer sex" practices.
2.
With technology and commercialization moving as fast as they are, I wonder if this assertion is still true for North Americans and Europeans in the 1990s.
3.
At least the language shifted. It may be that the public has never surrendered the attitude that sexual transgressions really do represent moral violations, as witnessed by the return to a public discourse dominated by moralistic language in the 1970s and 1980s.

Chapter 2
1.
This discussion is based on an unpublished manuscript by Carol Tavris and Leonore Tiefer, 1983, "The 'G' Spot, the Media and Science."

Chapter 4
1.
Robinson suggests that Masters and Johnson's "scheme of four phases" is "irrelevant" and "merely creates the impression of scientific precision where none exists" ( Robinson, 1976, p. 130). The reader is referred to his dissection of the model's stages.
2.
The same introduction persists in the just-released DSM-IV ( APA, 1994). See Chapter 10, note 1, for further information about DSM-IV
3.
Again, it must be emphasized that subject selection plays a large role, as acknowledged by Masters and Johnson: "Study subjects were selected because they were specifically facile in sexual response. . . . The carefully selected homosexual and heterosexual study subjects employed in the Institute's research programs must not be considered representative of a cross-section of sexually adult men and women in our culture" ( Masters and Johnson, 1979, pp. 61-62).

Chapter 9
1.
This speech was given to the Midcontinent Region of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sex, May 28, 1993, in response to being awarded the 1993 Alfred C. Kinsey Award for Distinguished Contribution to Sexology.

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sex Is Not a Natural Act and Other Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.