Slavery: History and Historians

By Peter J. Parish | Go to book overview

Bibliographic Essay

As the subject matter of the book itself is the recent historiography of slavery in the Old South, the main purpose of this bibliography is to draw together and, where necessary, to supplement information and evaluation scattered through the various chapters and their notes. This short essay does not set out to provide a comprehensive bibliography of slavery; like the book itself, the bibliography concentrates on the more important book length studies and refers to articles only where they are absolutely essential, and where the topic or the views of a particular historian would not otherwise be adequately covered. For studies of some of the more specialized topics, the reader will be referred to the relevant note or notes in a specific chapter.

It is not easy to digest the full implications of the expansion and transformation of the study of slavery which has taken place during the last generation. Until at least the second World War, the conventional wisdom on the subject derived above all from the work of Ulrich B. Phillips and his followers. It was essentially a view of slavery from above, focusing on the place of slavery in the Southern economy and in Southern white society, which was based on exclusively white sources, particularly plantation records, and which accepted the racial assumptions of the prevailing Southern white culture. It is true that this view was already under challenge in the inter-war period. The new impetus owed much to a small but growing band of black historians, inspired by a remarkable pioneer, Carter G. Woodson, and sustained by the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and the Journal of Negro History, and led into the next generation by a figure of towering authority in John Hope

-167-

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Slavery: History and Historians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Paradoxical Institution: 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Making of an Institution 11
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Labor of the Slaves 26
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - The Business of Slavery 43
  • Notes 61
  • 5 - The Lives of the Slaves 64
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - Variations, Exceptions, and Comparisons 97
  • Notes 121
  • 7 - Slavery and Southern White Society 124
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - The Death Throes of Slavery 149
  • Notes 165
  • Bibliographic Essay 167
  • Index 189
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