Warrior Women: The Amazons of Dahomey and the Nature of War

By Robert B. Edgerton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

As with any book that has been a long time in the making, this one owes much to people who are too numerous to mention. In addition to scores of graduate students in my anthropology classes at UCLA over the past few years, I would especially like to thank Orna Johnson, Jorja Prover, Keith Otterbein, Tom Weisner, Wally Goldschmidt, Alan Fiske, and Doug Hollan for their helpful suggestions. Special thanks are due to Rob Williams, my editor at Westview Press, for his many thoughtful comments on earlier drafts of the book, and to Margaret Ritchie for her superb copyediting.

I am grateful for the kindness and courtesy of the librarians at the British Museum, the British Public Records Office (Kew), the Bodleian Library of Oxford University, the Centre des Archives d'Outre-Mer in Aix-en-Provence, and especially the Inter-library Loan Department of the Charles E. Young Research Library at the University of California, Los Angeles. This book could never have been completed without the research assistance and manuscript preparation of Paula L. Wilkinson, R. Jean Cadigan, and Patricia A. Tilburg. Bravo! Along with Marta L. Wilkinson, Patricia Tilburg also helped greatly with translations of some French materials, something Linda Soares did for some Portuguese publications. Thanks, too, to Sharon Belkin for drawing the map.

Finally, although I have made use of primary materials such as journals, letters, and books of Europeans who visited Dahomey as well as some British and French government documents, I have also relied heavily on the work of past and present scholars, whose work did much to ease my journey into the complexities of

-vii-

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Warrior Women: The Amazons of Dahomey and the Nature of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Amazons of Dahomey 11
  • 2 - The Kingdom of Dahomey 37
  • 3 - The Creation of Majesty 71
  • 4 - The Rise and Fall of the Women Warriors 95
  • 5 - Gender Hierarchies and Women in War 121
  • Notes 157
  • Bibliography 173
  • Index 187
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