Our Public Debt: An Historical Sketch with a Description of United States Securities

By Harvey E. Fisk | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, John: Concludes treaty of peace with France--1800, 10
Bank notes: Depreciation of, enhances cost of War of 1812, 16
Bank of the United States, First: Proposed by Hamilton, 6; Congress fails to renew charter, 16; Loans to Government, 7
Bank of the United States, Second: Begins business 1817, 20; Jackson's opposition to, 24; United States takes $7,000,000 of stock, 21
Banks and United States bonds, 83; Circulation, 83; Public deposits, 85; Loans, 86
Barbary powers: Tribute paid to, 9; Purchase of vessels to protect commerce. 7; War with, 11
Bond values tables, 107
Budget, First national, nearly all for debt, 6
Certificates of Indebtedness, use in Great War, 57, 58, 70, 75, 85, 87
Circulation: Federal reserve bank notes, 83; Under Pittman Act, 84; National bank notes, 83 Civil War: Banking conditions unsatisfactory, 35; Cost, 38; Currency, demoralized status, excuse for issue of legal tender notes, 35; Financing--Secretary Chase's policy like Gallatin's in 1812, 34; Industrial expansion during and following, 41; Interest rates on debt at gold values, 39; ( 1869-1878), 42; Liquidating the war debt, 40-45; Maximum debt for, 37; Rapid decrease in debt following, 42, 43; Tax policy and receipts, 34, 38, 42; The national banks, 36; The two great war loans, 37; United States notes (legal tenders or "Greenbacks"), 35, 39
Confederation, debt of, 1
Coupon bonds, 92
Credit, Public defined by Hamilton, 5
Crisis, Financial--First in 1792, 6; of 1819, 21; 1837, 25; 1857, 27, 32
Currency crisis, 1894-1897, 46-52, 106; expansion, 1812, 16; 1862-1865, 40; and politics, 46
Debt--See Public Debt
Deficits: An empty treasury in 1837, 27; 1820 and 1821 met by bond sales, 21; Deficit financing--1837-1861, 26-33
Denominations of all bond issues, 102
District of Columbia: The price of Southern States cooperation in Hamilton's policy funding State debts, 3
Embargoes and non-intercourse with England and France, 12
England--See Great Britain
Federalist government: Ended 1801, 8;
Financial problems, 9
Federal Reserve Banks: Circulation, 84; Importance of aid in financing Great War, 56; Loans to member banks on U. S. bond collateral, 86 Florida: Purchased from Spain in 1824 for $5,000,000, 22
Foreign governments: Debts compared with that of U. S., 65; Loans to in Great War, 59, 62
Foreign trade: Disorganized 1805 to 1812, 12
France: Controversies with, 7, 10, 12, 14; Debt and wealth, 1919, 67; Interest charge and income, 66, 67, 68; Loan on account possible war, 7; Our debt to, 9; Re-acquires Louisiana from Spain. 11; Seizes our ships, 13; Treaty of peace with in 1800, 10, 11; Value of vessels seized by, 13
Gallatin, Albert: Financier of Jefferson's administration, 8; Results of administration of Treasury for ten years. 15; Secretary of Treasury, 8; Theory of war financing, 14; Views in regard to effect of war with France or England, 15
Germany: Debt and wealth, 1919, 66, 67; Interest charge and income, 66, 67;
Great Britain: Controversies with, 9; Debt and wealth, 1919, 66, 67, 68; Interest charge and income, 66, 67, 68; Jay's treaty with. 10; Strained relations 1805 to 1812, 12; War declared with, 1812, 13
Greenbacks--See United States notes
Gold reserve: Authority to maintain, 43. 44. 52; History of, 43, 44; Sale or bonds to create in 1878, 43; To maintain, 50

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