An Economic History of Canada

By Mary Quayle Innis | Go to book overview

EDITORIAL PREFACE--FIRST EDITION

In view of the limited work in the field of economics in Canada, it may seem presumptuous to attempt to write an economic history. On the other hand, sufficient research has been done to indicate the main lines of development, to warrant an outline and to suggest obvious gaps. Much of the work is not accessible to students in convenient form and a volume attempting to bring together significant material and general conclusions, to stimulate the particular interests of the student by reference to documents and to convey atmosphere to the general reader seemed urgently needed. It is concerned with the period of occupation and expansion in the northern half of the continent to 1939.

Intensive work in Canadian history has been concerned primarily with constitutional developments, and important outposts have been pushed into finance and money, notably by Dr. Adam Shortt, and Professor R. G. Trotter, and commercial credit by Professor D. G. Creighton. Gustavus Myers, A History of Canadian Wealth, has made suggestive contributions along the same lines. In the present volume, an attempt has been made to advance from the geographic and technological approach toward work done in the constitutional field and to stake out a broad field for the study of Canadian cultural growth. The emphasis has been on the forgotten areas, such as Hudson Bay, the Precambrian formation and the fishing banks, on the forgotten men, the fishermen, the Indians, the voyageurs, the slaves, the farmers, the lumbermen, the navvies and the miners; on forgotten commodities, the beaver, iron, brandy, rum, cod, square timber, potash, and placer gold, and on forgotten equipment, the canoe, the Durham and York boats, the stern-wheel steamboat and the sluice box. The interest has been in the continuous labour of Canadians who have shifted the scenes, rather than on those who have been engaged in the unseemly rush to take the curtain call. This is not to neglect the significance of the state, the church,

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Economic History of Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 363

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.