Toward Improving Ph. D. Programs

By Ernest V. Hollis | Go to book overview

Foreword

AT ONE of its earliest meetings the Commission on Teacher Education considered what, if anything, it might wisely undertake to do with respect to various questions relating to the preparation of college teachers. It agreed that these questions were important. It knew that college leaders were by no means wholly satisfied with the influence of graduate schools on the men and women who, after receiving the doctor's degree, joined their teaching staffs. Moreover it reahzed that the quality of college teaching is always a critical factor in determining the effectiveness of the education of teachers for the elementary and secondary schools, with whose preparation and in-service growth it was predominantly concerned. For these reasons the Commission determined to give such attention as proved feasible to problems of graduate practice.

The Commission was never able to study these problems as vigorously as it would have wished. For one reason, the special funds that would have been necessary to support any large attack proved unobtainable. It did find it possible, however, to engage in a number of activities and to secure access to a number of studies that served to throw considerable new light on the situation and to delineate the issues more sharply. This book is a report about those activities and studies. It describes and analyzes them and offers, especially in its concluding chapter, suggestions designed to point the way toward improving Ph.D. programs. Because the work of preparing college teachers is the task of graduate schools that do not sharply distinguish this function from others which they normally perform, it has been necessary to consider the situation of graduate schools as a whole.

This report has been prepared by Ernest V. Hollis who became a field coordinator on the staff of the Commission in 1940. Dr. Hollis conducted most of the conferences referred to,

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