Toward Improving Ph. D. Programs

By Ernest V. Hollis | Go to book overview

V

Suggestions from Academic Employers of Ph.D. Graduates

AS ALREADY NOTED, the statistical information presented in Chapters II and III was supplemented by an analysis of the ideas on graduate study held by certain administrators of university schools. Usable answers from the questionnaire mentioned in the preceding chapter were received from 85 graduate deans; from 66 presidents of colleges of liberal arts, teachers colleges, and junior colleges; from 34 staff members of collegiate faculties; and from 19 representatives of the public schools. These 204 individuals were from forty-three states, the Canal Zone, and the District of Columbia. They represented some of the largest and most influential institutions of higher learning in the country and also some of the smaller and experimental types.

While the sample cannot be regarded as quantitatively representative of American educators, it does constitute a selection of considerable qualitative significance. The intention at the time the questionnaires were distributed was to analyze the returns so as to show the expected differences in opinion on adequate doctoral training held by individuals in the several types of position and institution. The idea was abandoned when the data showed that the range of judgment within any one classification was as great as that between categories or for the group of educators as a whole.

The statements furnished for this study by 204 of the country's outstanding educators make extremely interesting reading.

-119-

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