Chronology
1894Born Philadelphia, December 7. Father art director of the Philadelphia Press to which Sloan,
Glackens, Luks and Shinn contributed during the nineties.
1901Moved to East Orange, New Jersey.
1909Entered East Orange High School.
1910Left school to study with Robert Henri in New York. Early association with Sloan, Coleman and
Glintenkamp. Exhibited with Independents.
1913Covers and drawings for The Masses. Cartoonist for Harpers Weekly. Five watercolors in Armory Show. Left Henri School. Summer, Provincetown.
1915Summer, Gloucester, where he returned almost yearly until 1934.
1916Exhibited with Independents. Left The Masses.
1917First one-man exhibition, Sheridan Square Gallery, New York.
1918One-man show, Ardsley Gallery, Brooklyn. Mapmaking for Army Intelligence Department. To
Havana with Coleman.
1923Summer, New Mexico.
1925One-man show, Newark Museum.
1927First one-man show, Downtown Gallery.
1928 Eggbeater pictures; end of May to Paris.
1929Return to New York, late August; to Gloucester. One-man show, Whitney Studio Galleries.
1930One-man show, Downtown Galleries.
1931Began teaching at Art Students League.
1932Participated in Museum of Modern Art mural exhibition. Mural for Radio City Music Hall. One- man show, Downtown Gallery.
1933Enrolled in Federal Art Project, December.
1934-Artists Congress activities: editor of the Art Front, 1935; national secretary, 1936; national
1939 chairman, 1938. W.P.A. murals. Mural for New York World's Fair.
1940Resigned from Artists Congress. Began to teach at New School for Social Research.
1941Retrospective exhibitions: Cincinnati Modern Art Society, and Indiana University.
1943One-man show, Downtown Gallery.
1945Retrospective exhibition, The Museum of Modern Art.

-4-

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Stuart Davis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Acknowledgments 2
  • Contents 3
  • Chronology 4
  • Stuart Davis 5
  • Bibliography 35
  • Index to Davis Quotations in Text 37
  • Index 37
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