The New Evolution: Zoogenesis

By Austin H. Clark | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
FEATURES COMMON TO MAN AND THE LOWER ANIMALS

THE existence in man, in the insects, in the birds, and in the rodents of so many strikingly similar mental traits which are conspicuously absent in the monkeys and in nearly all the other mammals must have some significance. There must be some underlying basic reason for this curious distribution of corresponding mental attributes. What have these various groups in common wherein they differ from the other creatures inhabiting the land? Can such diverse types of living things have anything in common?

Among the insects man-like mental attributes are almost exclusively confined to types in which the young are very different from the adults, either soft, delicate and apparently headless grubs as in the case of the ants, bees, and social, parasitic and predacious wasps -- the mud-daubers, digger wasps and others -- or soft bodied worm-like things as the young of caddis-flies and the caterpillars of small and feeble moths and butterflies. But they also occur in the white-ants or termites, which are weak and feeble in all stages, and in a few other types. What may be considered as the clothing of the insect body -- the construction about it of a more or less dense cocoon of silk, of itself alone or used as a binder for other sub-

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