The New Evolution: Zoogenesis

By Austin H. Clark | Go to book overview

EXPLANATION OF THE FIGURES
ILLUSTRATIONS OF ANIMAL SYMMETRIES (PAGE 5)
FIG. 1. -- A bilaterally symmetrical animal, with the two sides -- right and left -- of a plane passing through the middle of the body alike. The European spurge hawkmoth (Deilephila euphorbia).
FIG. 2. -- A bilaterally symmetrical animal. A curious fish (Halieutella lappa). From Gill, after Goode and Bean.
FIG. 3. -- A radially symmetrical animal -- eight similar sectors surround the central axis. A jellyfish (Discomedusa philippina) from the Philippines. From Mayor.
FIG. 4 -- An animal with "biradiate" symmetry -- that is, with radial symmetry modified by the elongation of the central mouth into a slit. A sea-anemone (Polysiphonia tuherosa) dredged from a depth of 3,390 feet. From the Challenger reports.
FIG. 5. -- A jointed or segmented tapeworm (Tænia macrocystis) from a wild-cat. The head, or "scolex," is radially symmetrical (four sided) but the body is bilaterally symmetrical. From Hall.
FIG. 6. -- Pseudoradial symmetry. The body is divided into five almost precisely similar parts, but the internal organs are not all radially symmetrical, and the young are bilaterally symmetrical. A sea-lily or crinoid (Ptilocrinus pinnatus) from a depth of 9,528 feet, originally described by the author.
DIFFERENT TYPES OF INSECTS (PAGE 21)
FIGS. 7-9. -- A plant-louse or aphid (Lachnus platanicola). Courtesy of the Department of Agriculture.
Fio. 10. -- The cotton-boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) with wings extended. Courtesy of the Department of Agriculture.
FIG. 11. -- The grape leaf-hopper (Typhlocyba comes). Courtesy of the Department of Agriculture.
FIG. 12. -- A whip-cracker butterfly (Ageronia fumosa).

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