TWENTY-SEVEN
CONFLICT ON TACTICS

A case, down for the next Tuesday, sent me back to London on Sunday night. For some days I heard nothing from the town; I rang up each night, but there was no news; and then, one morning in chambers, a telegram arrived from Hotchkinson, the solicitor who was managing the case for Eden: "Three clients arrested applying for bail this morning." It was now the middle of the month. I was not appearing in a London court until January; I decided to stay at Eden's until the first hearing was over.

When I arrived in the town, I was told they had been arrested late the night before. The warrant was issued on information sworn by someone called Iris Ward. The name meant nothing to me; but it added to Rachel's misery as soon as she heard it. "It will seem to George----" she said. "You see, she was once a member of the group."

They had spent the night in prison. This morning they had come before a magistrate: the charges were conspiracy to defraud against the three of them on two counts, the agency and the hostels; and also individual charges of obtaining money by false pretences against each on the two counts again. Nothing had been done except hear evidence of arrest and grant bail. The amount was fixed at £250 for each, and independent sureties of £250. This we had provided for in advance. Eden had arranged for two of his friends to transmit money raised by Morcom, Rachel, Roy Calvert and myself. For George and Jack, we had also been compelled to provide their private amount; for Olive, a friend of her uncle's had been willing to stand. The next hearing was fixed for December 29th.

I knew it would be good professional judgment to hold our hand in the police court on the 29th and let the case go for

-176-

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