THIRTY-NINE
THE LAST CROSSEXAMINATION

When George walked from the dock to the witness-box, the court was full. There were acquaintances whom he had made at the School and through Eden's firm; as well as close friends, there were several present whom he had quarrelled with and denounced. Canon Martineau, who had not attended to hear his brother, was in court this afternoon, by the Principal's side; Beddow and Miss Geary were also there, of that committee which George once attacked. Roy's father was the only one of the five who had not come to watch. Roy himself stood at the back of the court, making a policeman fetch chairs for Mr. and Mrs. Passant. Daphne and Rachel stood near to Roy. Eden sat in the place he had occupied throughout the trial. And there were others who had come under George's influence -- many of them not ready to believe what they heard against him.

As he waited in the box, the court was strained to a pitch it had not reached before. There was dislike, envy and contempt ready for him; others listened apprehensively for each word, and were moved for him to the bottom of their hearts.

At that moment, just as Getliffe was beginning his first question, the judge intervened with a business-like discussion of the time-table of the case. "Unless you finish by tomorrow lunch-time," (Saturday) he said, "I shall have to leave it over until Monday. I particularly want to have next week clear for other work. If you could cut anything superfluous out of your cross-examination this afternoon -- then perhaps you" (he turned to Getliffe) "could begin your final speech today."

Getliffe agreed in a word; he felt the suspense in the court, tightened by this unexpected delay. But Porson argued for

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