FORTY-THREE
THE LAST DAY

Porson's closing speech lasted until after twelve on the Monday morning, and the judge's summing up was not quite finished when the court rose for lunch. The fog still lay over the town, and every light in the room was on all through the morning.

Porson's tone was angry and aggrieved. He tried to develop the Farm business more elaborately now. "He ought to know it's too late": Getliffe scribbled this note on a piece of paper and passed it to me. The feature that stood out of his speech was, however, his violent attack on Martineau.

"His character has been described to you as, I think I remember, a saint. So far as I can see, Mr. Martineau's main claim to the title is that he threw up his profession and took an extended holiday -- which he has no doubt enjoyed -- at someone else's expense. Mr. Martineau told you he wasn't above deceiving someone who regarded him as a friend. In a way that might damage the friend seriously, just for the sake of flattering Mr. Martineau's own powers as a religious leader. Either that story it true -- which I don't for a moment believe, which you in the weight of all the other evidence can't believe either -- or else he's perjuring himself in this court. I am not certain which is regarded by my learned friend as the more complete proof of saintliness. From everything Mr. Martineau said, from the story of his life both in this town and since he found an easier way of living, it's incredible that anyone should put any faith in his declaration before this court."

From his bitterness, one or two spectators guessed that the case was important to him. Towards the end of his speech, which was ill-proportioned, he made an attempt to reply to Getliffe's excursion over "a child of his time." He returned to

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