A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

CONTENTS.
Page .
CHAPTER I .

Origin of the English and French claim to North America--First attempt at settlement by French Protestants--Destroyed by the Spaniards--Sir Humphrey Gilbert and Sir Walter Raleigh attempt a settlement--Grant to South and North Virginia Companies--French grant to De Monts--First settlement of Virginia. Plymouth, and the other English Colonies-Extent of their grants --North Virginia, first called New England in 1614-Grant of New England to the Plymouth Company--New York settled by the Dutch--French discoveries under de la Salle, 13

CHAPTER II .

Different forms of governments in the Colonies--Puritans settle Plymouth in 1620--Form a government for themselves--Intercourse of the Dutch with the people of Plymouth--Massachusetts second Colony in New England--Obtains a Charter from the King--government of the Colonies placed in the hands of Commissioners--Their powers and conduct--Surrender of the great Plymouth Charter to the Crown--Reasons for it--People first represented in the General Court in Massachusetts in 1634--government established in the Colonies of Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Haven--Confederacy of the New England Colonies--Proprietary governments of Maryland, the Carolinas, New Jersey and Pennsylvania--Disputes between the Proprietors and Settlers--People of South Carolina renounce the Proprietary Government--Proprietors of New Jersey surrender their government to the crown--Royal Governments-- Government of Virginia under the London Company and during the civil wars in England--Application of Virginia for a Charter--Government of New York under the Dutch and the Duke of York--People of New York first represented in the Assembly in 1683--Government of Leisler--Conduct of Governors Slaughter and Fletcher, 31

CHAPTER III .

Colonists consider themselves entitled to the rights of Englishmen--Claim the right of representation--Disputes with the crown of this subject--Opinions of eminent lawyers on this question--Declaration of rights by the assembly of New York in 1691--Declarations of the colonies at various times on the right of taxation--Various acts of Parliament restricting the trade and manufactures of the colonies--The origin and causes of these acts--Their effects in the colonies and opinions concerning them--Mode of enforcing them--board of trade and plantations established--Objects and powers of this board--Rice included among the enumerated commodities in a clandestine manner--Acts of parliament concerning hats and hatters--Manufacture of iron and steel prohibited-- Slitting mills, plating forges and furnaces, in the colonies declared common nuisances--Governors ordered to destroy them--Principles and opinions of English writers concerning the trade and manufactures of the colonies, 85.

CHAPTER IV .

Charters of Connecticut and Rhode Island obtained at a favorable moment--Measures taken to resume the Charters--Difference between the crown and the colonists on this subject--Declaration of Massachusetts concerning charter

-9-

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A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Note 8
  • Contents 9
  • Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 85
  • Chapter IV 107
  • Chapter V 132
  • Chapter VI 155
  • Chapter VII 213
  • Chapter VIII 282
  • Chapter IX 328
  • Chapter X 384
  • Appendix--Notes 423
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