A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.

Convicts transported to the Plantations from England--The Colonies of Virginia and Maryland pass Laws respecting them--These Laws disapproved by the Crown-- This conduct of the Parent Country injurious to the Colonies, and excites their indignation--Privilege of the writ of Habeas Corpus, supposed by the Board of Trade not to extend to the Colonies--Act of Massachusetts concerning the writ of Habeas Corpus disallowed by the Crown--Colonists still retain an affection for their Parent Country--Bounties allowed by Parliament for certain articles produced in the Colonies--Mode of Colonial Contributions--Extent of the English and French Claims in North America--Plan of Union among the Colonies adopted in 1754--Disapproved by the Crown and the Colonial Legislatures--Ministerial plan for defending the Colonies--Reasons of Dr. Franklin against it--War of 1756, in consequence of disputed Claims in America--Quebec taken--Family compact between France and Spain--Havana taken--Peace of 1763--French power in America destroyed--Colonial Schools for General Education--First established in Massachusetts by law, in 1647--Objects of their establishment--The Clergy of New England assist in establishing these Schools-- Colleges founded in the Colonies--Character of the People of America different from that of those of Europe--Some of the causes of this difference.

In this brief summary of the political state of the colonies previous to 1763, we cannot forbear noticing, as necessarily connected with it, the conduct of the parent country, in transporting to America, those persons, who for their crimes, had forfeited their liberty and lives in Great Britain. In this, the social as well as political happiness of the colonists were totally disregarded. Transportation to the plantations, was authorized, in lieu of punishments inflicted for some of the greatest crimes committed in society; and America was made an asylum for the worst of felons.

This practice first commenced under the reign of James I, who, by his royal prerogative, adopted the measure of "ordering dissolute persons to be sent to Virginia."* This was afterwards continued; and convicts were transported to the other colonies, as well as Virginia; and was finally authorized and regulated by

____________________
*
Chalmers, p. 364.

-132-

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A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Note 8
  • Contents 9
  • Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 85
  • Chapter IV 107
  • Chapter V 132
  • Chapter VI 155
  • Chapter VII 213
  • Chapter VIII 282
  • Chapter IX 328
  • Chapter X 384
  • Appendix--Notes 423
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