A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1

By Timothy Pitkin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.

Congress of the Colonies in September, 1774--The conduct of Massachusetts approved--A Committee appointed to state the rights of the Colonies--Their violations and the means of redress--Suffolk resolutions approved--Declaration of the rights of the Colonies,--Non importation, non-consumption, and non-exportation agreement--Address to the King--To the people of Great Britain--To the inhabitants of the Colonies, and to the inhabitants of the Province of Quebec-- Galloway proposes a plan of reconciliation--This postponed--Congress is dissolved in October--Proceedings of Congress approved by the Colonies--LordChatham's motion for the recall of the troops from Boston--His speech on this motion--His conciliatory Bill--Rejected by a large majority--Parliament determines to enforce obedience--Augments the Army and Navy--Restrains the trade and fisheries of the Colonies--Indirect negociations with Dr. Franklin, as to terms of reconciliation--LordNorth's conciliatory proposition--Its object--Disarming some of the Colonies contemplate--Preparations for defense in the Colonies--Hostilities commence in Massachusetts--Excite great alarm--Massachusetts Convention raise troops and prepared an address to the people of Great Britain.

On the 5th of September, 1774, the second general congress, since the peace of 1763, met at Philadelphia, where all the colonies were represented except Georgia. Peyton Randolph, one of the delegates from Virginia, was elected president, and Charles Thompson, a citizen of Philadelphia, was chosen secretary.

The delegates from Massachusetts were empowered "to deliberate and determine upon wise and proper measures, to be by them recommended to all the colonies, for the recovery and reestablishment of their just rights and liberties, civil and religious, and the restoration of union and harmony, so ardently desired by all good men."

The general instructions given to the delegates of Pennsylvania, directed them to meet in congress, "to consult together upon the present unhappy state of the colonies, and to form and adopt a plan for purposes of obtaining redress of American grievances, ascertaining American rights, upon the most solid and constitutional principles, and for establishing that union and harmony, which is indispensably necessary to the welfare and happiness of

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A Political and Civil History of the United States of America, from the Year 1763 to the Close of the Administration of President Washington, in March, 1797: Including a Summary View of the Political and Civil State of the North American Colonies, Prior to That Period - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Note 8
  • Contents 9
  • Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 85
  • Chapter IV 107
  • Chapter V 132
  • Chapter VI 155
  • Chapter VII 213
  • Chapter VIII 282
  • Chapter IX 328
  • Chapter X 384
  • Appendix--Notes 423
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