Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes

By Rosey E. Pool | Go to book overview

BOBB HAMILTON

came to New York from Cleveland, Ohio, where he spent most of his youth and had his higher education (psychology and philosophy) at Ohio State University. In 1957, at the New School in New York, he won a scholarship in creative writing.

'My ambition is to write publishable, immortal poetry and prose. I write short stories and essays, too--this makes me a commoner amongst other writers. I am also an excellent sculptor--naturally--I hope that too will be lastingly significant! At present I am a therapist at a hospital, longing to be free in order to do nothing but sculpt and write.'


PYGMALION

You don't know me
Because instead
Of looking at me
You hid
Behind twin mirror cataracts
And made yourself an
Obsidian image
While the real me stood--
A Prisoner for four-hundred years
In a dim corner of your ante-chamber.
While I gathered my strength
I watched you imitate
Life, and play at little games
With unreal rules.
Soon I shall be
born;
I shall break out of my
Tomb
Shattering all of your
False idols
and scattering the pieces
Across the floors of
your dirty mansion.

-110-

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Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Julian Bond 35
  • Gwendolyn Brooks 51
  • Linda Brown 54
  • Sterling A. Brown 56
  • Ray Durem 103
  • Mari Evans 105
  • Julia Fields 107
  • Carl Gardner 109
  • Bobb Hamilton 110
  • Ted Joans 131
  • Percy Johnston 133
  • Leroi Jones 135
  • Oliver Lagrone 138
  • Audre Lord 140
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