Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes

By Rosey E. Pool | Go to book overview

TED JOANS

was born on July 4th, 1928, he says, in Cairo ( Georgia, I assume), 'yeah . . . on a riverboat. Yeah . . . they had jazzbands. . . . from New Orleans.' Joans is a typical exponent of the Greenwich Village beat-jazz generation about whom Corinth Books have just published his amusing, satirical picture-collage-cartoons: THE HIPSTERS. He has four children, who live in Michigan with their mother: 'a red one, a white one, a blue one and a gold one. . . . Tuli, Krim, MeDarrah, Kline and cats like that is what I dig. Jazz is my religion. I shall never give up my citizenship, I'll always remain a Yankee Doodle dandy. . . . I have travelled to twenty-eight countries and dug the foreign scene and that's for me. . . . I want to he free now. . . . Free as the white American that is envolved in the arts. Man, it's a big drag to have to create under a false flag. Like man that's my first reason for splitting and my second reason is Africa. I want to work in the new countries and hip them to what's happening in the arts in the U.S.A. Some cats, especially college. type spades, tell me to stay here and fight . . . man, I'd never last one hour in Atlanta or Miami . . . I don't want so much, just to be free human being and treated as such.'


THINK TWICE AND BE NICE

(for white bigots only)

All God's Spades . . . got shades and some of God's
Spades
(you'll never know which one)
has got long-sharp protective blades So I
shall repeat
(though he may be raggidy or neat)

ALL GOD'S Spades Got shades

-131-

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Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Julian Bond 35
  • Gwendolyn Brooks 51
  • Linda Brown 54
  • Sterling A. Brown 56
  • Ray Durem 103
  • Mari Evans 105
  • Julia Fields 107
  • Carl Gardner 109
  • Bobb Hamilton 110
  • Ted Joans 131
  • Percy Johnston 133
  • Leroi Jones 135
  • Oliver Lagrone 138
  • Audre Lord 140
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