Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes

By Rosey E. Pool | Go to book overview

LEROI JONES

was born on October 7th, 1934, in Newark, New Jersey. He began his higher education at Howard University and finished with an M.A. in Philosophy at Columbia University.

His poems found their way into various poetry magazines of the United States, his essays and jazz criticisms as far as CRUCIBLE, a periodical published in Scotland.

He also contributes to the new New York Quarterly URBANITE (Images of the American Negro). His published books are one Volume of poems: PREFACE TO A TWENTY- VOLUME SUICIDE NOTE (Totem Press in association with Cornish Brooks, N.Y., 11, 1961) and a study on the sociological implications of blues.

'. . . Ambitions? To write beautiful poems full of mystical sociology and abstract politics. To show America it is ugly and full of middle-class toads (black and white).

'To become a great political agitator and invade Britain.'


THE END OF MAN 19 HIS BEAUTY

And silence
which proves but
a referent
to my disorder.

Your world shakes
cities die
beneath your shape.

The single shadow
at noon
like a live tree
whose leaves
are like clouds

Weightless soul
at whose love faith moves
as a dark and
withered day.

-135-

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Beyond the Blues: New Poems by American Negroes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 11
  • Julian Bond 35
  • Gwendolyn Brooks 51
  • Linda Brown 54
  • Sterling A. Brown 56
  • Ray Durem 103
  • Mari Evans 105
  • Julia Fields 107
  • Carl Gardner 109
  • Bobb Hamilton 110
  • Ted Joans 131
  • Percy Johnston 133
  • Leroi Jones 135
  • Oliver Lagrone 138
  • Audre Lord 140
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