Narratives of New Netherland, 1609-1664

By J. Franklin Jameson | Go to book overview

II
NARRATIVE OF FATHER JOGUES, REPORTED
BY FATHER BUTEUX, 1645

UPON the return from this journey, they command the Father to go and accompany some fishermen, who conducted him seven or eight leagues below a Dutch settlement. While he was engaged in that exercise, he learned from the lips of some Hiroquois who came to that quarter that they were awaiting him in the village to burn him. This news was the occasion of his deliverance, of which--having sufficiently mentioned it in the Relation for the year 1642 and 1643, chapter 14 1--I will relate here only some particulars of which there has been but little if any mention. The Dutch having given him the opportunity to enter a ship, the Hiroquois complained of it; he was withdrawn thence and conducted to the house of the captain, who gave him in custody to an old man, until they should have appeased those barbarians. In a word, if they had persevered in their demand, and rejected some presents that were made to them, the Father would have been given up into their hands, to be the object of their fury and food for their fires. Now, while they were awaiting the opportunity to send him back to Europe, he remained six weeks under the guard of that old man, who was very miserly, and lodged him in an old garret, where hunger, and thirst, and heat, and the fear at every moment of falling back into the hands of the Hiroquois, gave him excellent reason to cast and submerge himself within the providence of Him who had so often caused him to realize His presence. This man was the sutler of that settlement; he made lye every fortnight, then carried back his tub to the garret, in which he put water which served the Father for drink until the next lye-making. This

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1
See the preceding pages.

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