Depression, Recovery and Higher Education: A Report by Committee Y of the American Association of University Professors. The Draft of This Report Was Prepared by Malcolm M. Willey

By Malcolm M. Willey; American Association of University Professors | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
PROMOTION, APPOINTMENT, AND TENURE POLICY DURING THE DEPRESSION

THE materials thus far presented might suggest that policies governing promotions and salaries were extensively modified by depression conditions. The subject warrants more detailed consideration, and the questions that are to be raised may in each instance be approached first from the institutional side, and then in terms of the individuals that are involved. That is, one wishes to know how many colleges, universities, and teacher training colleges have pursued a given policy, and then, in addition, one wishes to inquire how many men and women teachers are affected in the application of the policy. This dual approach will be followed throughout this chapter.

1. Were There Promotions with Increase in Salary during Depression Years? Sixty-eight of the 125 institutions in the committee's sample promoted one or more men with salary increases during the period; 20 institutions indicated no promotions with salary increases; in 37 returns no answer was given to the question. There has been no attempt to press this considerable number of "no answers" further, but there is some basis for assuming that many of them meant no promotions. When the institutions at which promotions with salary increases were made are subclassified, as shown in Table 18, they are seen to predominate in the East and the South, with the western institutions in a definitely secondary position. More private institutions made salaried promotions (87.9 per cent of those replying) than either the public institutions (75.7 per cent) or those with denominational support, which had the poorest record in this respect (61.1 per cent). Size does not appear as an important factor in association with a policy of salaried promotions, except that the Size III institutions made a somewhat poorer showing.1 The relative stability of the private college and university is again suggested. At first glance it may appear surprising that so large a number of institutions did continue to make promotions with salary increases in the depression years, but it should

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1
It should be noticed in Table 18 that "no answers" increase directly with the size of institution. This probably reflects the difficulty of obtaining the details called for by this question at the larger institutions.

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