Depression, Recovery and Higher Education: A Report by Committee Y of the American Association of University Professors. The Draft of This Report Was Prepared by Malcolm M. Willey

By Malcolm M. Willey; American Association of University Professors | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN POLICY DISCUSSION

REPEATEDLY in these chapters thus far the problem of faculty participation in the discussion of administrative policies that affect faculty members has intruded. The growth in size of American institutions has resulted in the gradual emergence of administrative staffs whose functions are largely divorced from teaching and whose attention centers almost exclusively in matters of administration. It is in these administrative groups that policies tend to be formulated; it is these administrative officers who are in a position to exert powerful influences determining the forms of institutional practice. Unfortunately a cleavage in point of view sometimes develops with reference to a given problem; or administrative decisions are made upon the basis of evidence not possessed by or shared with the faculty members; or an element of administrative arbitrariness creeps in that is disturbing to the teaching staff. It is a truism that the success of an educational institution will be dependent upon the existence of a considerable degree of mutual trust and understanding between faculty and administrators. The faculty member stands to his administrative officers in a somewhat different relation from that of the employee of a business concern to his executives. There is reason, therefore, why faculty members should discuss and be given voice in questions that touch them and their work, and why college and university administrators must take staff members into their confidence in matters that pertain to the faculty. Arbitrary attitudes upon the part of administrators and boards toward the faculty members are no less serious than tendencies toward inertia on the part of faculties in the discussion of their own problems.

It has thus far been demonstrated that teaching staffs at institutions of higher education in this country have not remained untouched by the changes induced by depression circumstances. There was a two-year lag, and under some favorable conditions faculties may not have experienced unemployment or even a reduction in salary. But to the great body of men and women on college faculties, a severe depression will come with an adverse impact. Even though the shock

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Depression, Recovery and Higher Education: A Report by Committee Y of the American Association of University Professors. The Draft of This Report Was Prepared by Malcolm M. Willey
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 552

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.