Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon

By Roderic D. Matthews; Matta Akrawi | Go to book overview

Chapter 5 INSTITUTIONS FOR TEACHER TRAINING

INSTITUTIONS for the training of teachers have, for the most part, developed as a particular type of school experienced a shortage of teachers or as a new type of school was established. Courses in such institutions have been shortened at need and lengthened when an emergency was less acute.


Training Schools for Elementary Teachers

There are separate schools for training men and women for teaching in the elementary schools. The course for men is six years in length; for women who have had a two-year course above the regular elementary school the course is five years. Some of the training schools for women include an advanced course of two years, graduates of which may be assigned to teach in primary schools for girls. Students are accepted on the basis of an entrance examination conducted by the elementary-training school and in addition must pass a medical examination. There are many more applicants than can be accommodated. The faculties of these schools have received their preparation in postsecondary schools and hold a bachelor's degree or its equivalent. The schools charge no fees, and those for women usually have boarding departments for girls from the villages. In 1945-46 there were 9 schools for men and 8 for women distributed throughout the provinces.

The program of studies for these training schools includes advanced courses of the primary school and lower courses of the secondary school with a different time allotment; and, in the upper years there are courses in psychology, principles and practices of education, special methods of teaching and practice teaching. The schools for women include courses in needlework, laundry-work, and housekeeping, including cooking. The pattern of courses is equally set for men and for women: no election of courses or specialization is permitted. Student organizations are considered ample outlets for special interests and abilities. Excursions to points of interest in the vicinity are arranged by the school.

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