Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon

By Roderic D. Matthews; Matta Akrawi | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
PRIVATE AND FOREIGN SCHOOLS

FOR THE PAST century government, or public, education in Egypt has been supplemented by private and foreign institutions at most levels, such extension of educational opportunity being regarded with tolerance if not always with unqualified enthusiasm by the government.

Private schools must be registered, their staff, program, and physical facilities approved, and they are subject to government inspection. Some are operated for profit as private ventures by individuals, while others are established and administered by organizations interested in providing for a religious group or for a foreign community. Most of these schools accept pupils of other denominations or nationalities.

Foreign schools have been established for the most part by religious interests, usually as mission schools. Protestant schools are maintained by the American United Presbyterian Mission and the Church Missionary Society of England, while Roman Catholic schools have been established by French and Italian religious orders. In addition, there are lay schools for British, American, French, Italian, and Greek children. Table 16 gives the enrollment in private, foreign, and government schools for 1942-43, showing that approximately 25 percent of all pupils in elementary (including all levels below the secondary) schools were in private and foreign schools, but slightly more than 50 percent of secondary-school pupils were in such schools. Detailed statistics for that year show that in primary schools alone, 25 percent of the pupils were in government schools, 27 percent in foreign schools, and 48 percent in private schools. Unpublished statistics for 1944- 45 show that government and private schools had increased their enrollments partly at the expense of foreign schools. This situation developed from the government's action in eliminating fees in its own primary schools and granting subsidies to private and foreign schools which agreed to eliminate fees. More private than foreign schools accepted the subsidies in lieu of tuition fees. Approximately 80 percent of all children in private elementary schools are in Muslim private schools or those maintained by

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.