Education in Arab Countries of the Near East: Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Transjordan, Syria, Lebanon

By Roderic D. Matthews; Matta Akrawi | Go to book overview

Chapter 12
HIGHER EDUCATION AND EDUCATIONAL MISSIONS

THERE IS AS YET no university in Iraq. At least two attempts were made in 1943 and 1945 to incorporate the present colleges into a university, but neither attempt went beyond producing a draft charter and a draft law for the proposed university. Higher education as it now stands, therefore, is provided in separate colleges directed towards education for the professions. These are the Higher Teachers College, the Royal College of Medicine (with which is included the College of Pharmacy), the Law College, and the College of Engineering. To these must be added the three-year course of the Queen 'Aliyah Institute. No liberal-arts college existed at the time of the visit of the American Council Commission. The Higher Teachers College comes nearest to a liberal-arts college of the American type, combining academic and professional education as American colleges often do. There are, however, at least two important differences. The College is exclusively for the education of teachers; and, instead of a fluid elective system where individual courses may be combined in almost infinite alternatives, selection is limited to five parallel programs, the courses in which are almost all required.

The Higher Teachers College and the Queen 'Aliyah Institute have already been dealt with in the discussion of teacher education in the pre- ceding chapter. The present chapter will describe the other colleges and educational missions abroad.


The Royal College of Medicine and Associated Schools

The Royal College of Medicine has associated with it under the same dean, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Nursing, and the School of Health Officials.

The Royal College of Medicine, established in Baghdad on the grounds of the Royal Hospital in 1927, provides the only medical training available in Iraq. The course is six years in length including one year of internship. New students are selected on the basis of the public secondary-school

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