CHAPTER II.

WHEN Madame Heine realized, after the downfall of Napoleon, that there was no longer an opening in the military profession for her eldest son, she was sorely exercised as to how to help the hand of Providence. The Rector Schallmeyer, who presided at the Lycée, and was a friend of the Heines, urged that his clever pupil should be educated as an ecclesiastic with a view to his ultimately becoming an abbé. But though Heinrich in later life relished the idea -- for he thought that as an unattached abbé he could comfortably have served both God and Mammon -- neither he nor his shrewd mother considered the rector's project favourably.

As for the profession of medicine, Heine would have none of it. His métier, as time was to prove, was not to wound people with lances but with verbal poniards -- much more agonizing instruments than those kept in leathern cases. In the administration of black draught he would probably have proved an empirical fraud: in the application of biting satire he was without a rival.

Finally, after some tears and remonstrances, Herr Heine's first-born was convinced that he had no option

-35-

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Life of Heinrich Heine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introductory Note. 9
  • Life of Heine - Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 35
  • Chapter III 62
  • Chapter IV 86
  • Chapter V 109
  • Chapter VI 134
  • Chapter VII 169
  • Chapter VIII 188
  • Index. 213
  • Bibliography i
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