brief lyrics without recognizing that no such singer had ever before so charmed the German ear, and that not even Burns lilted a sweeter and more irresponsible note. Many of the pieces are known wherever Germans congregate, for they have been set to music perhaps equally imperishable: such, to mention a few, are "Im wunderschönen Monat Mai,""Wenn ich in deine Augen seh'," "Lehn deine Wang' an meine Wang',""Auf Flügeln des Gesanges,""Ein Fichtenbaum steht einsam."1

The briefer and more irresponsible these lyrics, the more untranslatable are they. That of the Pine and Palm has been oftener translated into English than any other of Heine's poems. I have selected Miss Bessie Craigmyle's version as the one that seemed to me best,

"A Pine-tree standeth lonely
On a far Norland height,
It slumbereth, while around it
The snow falls thick and white.

And of a Palm it dreameth,
That, in a southern land,
Lonely and silent standeth
Amid the scorching sand."

It would be impossible for any poet to more exquisitely express the vague informulate yearning of the soul than Heine has done in this ßawless lyric. Only Shelley, among all the plaintive choir who have sung with their "breast up-till a thorne," could so have given voice to his secret pain.

____________________
1
1. In the wondrously-lovely month of May. 2. When I look into thine eyes. 3. Lean thy cheek against my cheek. 4. On the wings of song. 5. A Pine-tree standeth lonely.

-61-

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Life of Heinrich Heine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introductory Note. 9
  • Life of Heine - Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 35
  • Chapter III 62
  • Chapter IV 86
  • Chapter V 109
  • Chapter VI 134
  • Chapter VII 169
  • Chapter VIII 188
  • Index. 213
  • Bibliography i
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