it was with anything but a lightsome heart. Departure signified the renunciation for a time of the society which had meant so much to him, of the friends in whom he had so delighted, of the literary stimulus which had been so invaluable. Moreover, he was now no longer a nobody -- merely a clever Jewish youth with creditable introductions. He had made his mark, not less surely though limitedly. As the author of the promising and in many ways remarkable "Young Sorrows," and of the in every sense noteworthy "Lyrical Interlude," of "Ratcliff," and of "Almansor," he had gained a foremost place among the youngest writers of Germany. His repute had not spread throughout the country, though in tlie Rhineland he was known not only as a poet, but as a Berlin correspondent and as an able and fearless reviewer. It did not render the home-going more enticing in prospect that his writings met with little or no appreciation from his relatives; even his mother lamented that her Harry was not in some reputable trade or honourable profession.

At Lëneburg a deep depression settled upon him. He could not then see his way to making a living by literature; he had the utmost aversion from business; and for the profession of medicine he was not capable; while for that of the law, for which he cared little, it would be necessary to discard the Jewish faith and embrace Christianity. From the outset Heine disliked the idea of apostasy, yet he could not but be influenced by the urgent parental and avuncular advice which almost daily admonished him to look to "the main chance," particularly as in Berlin he had seen examples of conversion

-63-

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Life of Heinrich Heine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introductory Note. 9
  • Life of Heine - Chapter I 13
  • Chapter II 35
  • Chapter III 62
  • Chapter IV 86
  • Chapter V 109
  • Chapter VI 134
  • Chapter VII 169
  • Chapter VIII 188
  • Index. 213
  • Bibliography i
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