Chapter 7
The Cabinet Mission's Plan

ANNOUNCEMENT from London that three British Cabinet Ministers would visit India,1 to help solve her constitutional problems, was made on February 19th -- oddly enough, the very day when the R.I.N. mutiny broke out; and some have suggested, perhaps not very convincingly, that the startling news from Bombay spurred on their work. At all events, after reaching India with their staff on March 24th, and entering on a busy round of interviews, they soon left almost no doubt that Sardar Patel's conviction was right: the British Government genuinely wanted to transfer power to Indian hands soon, and the Mission would press hard, and far, to achieve agreement on how to do this during their stay. All the news that filtered out from Delhi about the conversations went to confirm this.

Throughout April, the talks went on -- as the weather got warmer. Early in May, it became clear that the Mission's efforts to bring about agreement between Congress and League were unavailing. They accordingly decided to put forward proposals of their own, their so-called Plan, or more properly Statement. It came out on May 16th. This is no place for describing its complicated details. In essence, however, it set forth methods for creating an ingenious three-tiered constitutional structure for a united India, which nevertheless did not totally prevent the eventual emergence of something like Pakistan if that was really desired; and, while such a Constitution was being worked out, for acceptance by a Constituent Assembly, the Plan proposed that a new 'Interim' Government should replace the existing one at the Centre, endowed with the widest possible powers, and including no British member except the Viceroy. Thus the Plan -- though less obviously than the Cripps offer of 1942, for its mention of the Interim Government was brief -- fell into two parts, a long-term one and a short; and these parts, it was later explicitly stated, formed an integrated whole which must be accepted or rejected together.

Rather to many people's surprise, since the provisions relating to a possible Pakistan seemed at first glance much too vague to square

____________________
1
Lord Pethick-Lawrence, Sir Stafford Cripps, and Mr. A. M. (later Viscount) Alexander.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pakistan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Maps 10
  • Part I 11
  • Chapter I - The Idea 13
  • Chapter 2 - The Land 33
  • Chapter 3 - Some Social Problems 48
  • Part II 67
  • Chapter 4 - Retrospect, 1857-1946 69
  • Chapter 5 - Towards Civil War 80
  • Chapter 6 - Trouble in the Armed Forces 86
  • Chapter 7 - The Cabinet Mission's Plan 96
  • Chapter 8 - Civil War -- I 108
  • Chapter 9 - Change of Viceroys 120
  • Chapter 10 - The Sikh Problem 131
  • Chapter II - Civil War -- II 137
  • Chapter 12 - Civil War -- III 147
  • Part III 167
  • Chapter 13 - Birth of a Nation -- I 169
  • Chapter 14 - Birth of a Nation -- II 182
  • Chapter 15 - Mainly About Kashmir 192
  • Chapter 16 - Defence and Foreign Affairs 212
  • Chapter 17 - Some Economic Problems 223
  • Chapter 28 - Politics and Constitution, 1947-58 229
  • Chapter 19 - Military Revolution 246
  • Postscript 262
  • Bibliography 265
  • Maps 269
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.