Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, 1604-1618

By Samuel de Champlain; W. L. Grant | Go to book overview

On the 22d of August, a small barque was seen approaching our settlement. It was that of Des Antons, of St. Malo, who had come from Canseau, where his vessel was engaged in fishing, to inform us that there were some vessels1 about Cape Breton engaged in the fur-trade; and that, if we would send our ship, we might capture them on the point of returning to France. It was determined to do so as soon as some supplies, which were in the ship, could be unloaded.

This being done, Pont Gravé embarked, together with his companions, who had wintered with him at Port Royal, excepting Champdoré and Foulgeré de Vitré. I also stayed with De Poutrincourt, in order, with God's help, to complete the map of the coasts and countries which I had commenced. Every thing being put in order in the settlement, Sieur de Poutrincourt ordered provisions to be taken on board for our voyage along the coast of Florida.

On the 29th of August, we set out from Port Royal, as did also Pont Gravé and Des Antons, who were bound for Cape Breton and Canseau, to seize the vessels which were engaging in the fur-trade, as I have before stated. After getting out to sea, we were obliged to put back on account of bad weather. But the large vessel kept on her course, and we soon lost sight of her.


Chapter 13

Sieur de Poutrincourt sets out from Port Royal to make discoveries. All that was seen, and what took place as far as Mallebarre.

On the 5th of September, we set out again from Port Royal.2 On the 7th, we reached the mouth of the river St. Croix, where we found a large number of savages, among others

____________________
1
See Lescarbot, book IV., ch. XIII. This was an old offender, named Boyer, who succeeded on this occasion in making his escape.
2
Lescarbot, who remained in charge at Port Royal, busied himself with gardening, and with digging drains.

-88-

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