Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, 1604-1618

By Samuel de Champlain; W. L. Grant | Go to book overview

from its effects, which clearly shows that salt food is not nourishing, but quite the contrary in this disease.

On the 5th of June, a shallop arrived at our settlement with Sieur des Marais,1 a son-in-law of Pont Gravé, bringing us the tidings that his father-in-law had arrived at Tadoussac on the 28th of May. This intelligence gave me much satisfaction, as we entertained hopes of assistance from him. Only eight out of the twenty-eight at first forming our company were remaining, and half of these were ailing.

On the 7th of June, I set out from Quebec for Tadoussac on some matters of business, and asked Sieur des Marais to stay in my place until my return, which he did.

Immediately upon my arrival, Pont Gravé and I had a conference in regard to some explorations which I was to make in the interior, where the savages had promised to guide us. We determined that I should go in a shallop with twenty men, and that Pont Gravé should stay at Tadoussac to arrange the affairs of our settlement; and this determination was carried out, he spending the winter there. This arrangement was especially desirable, since I was to return to France, according to the orders sent out by Sieur de Monts, in order to inform him of what I had done and the explorations I had made in the country.

After this decision, I set out at once from Tadoussac, and returned to Quebec, where I had a shallop fitted out with all that was necessary for making explorations in the country of the Iroquois, where I was to go with our allies, the Montagnais.


Chapter 7

Departure from Quebec and voyage to the Isle St. Éloi. Meeting there with the Algonquins and Ochataiguins.

With this purpose, I set out on the 18th of the month. Here the river begins to widen, in some places to the breadth

____________________
1
Claude Godet, Sieur des Marets. He married Jeanne, the only daughter of Pont Gravé. His younger brother Jean was the Sieur du Parc, afterwards mentioned.

-149-

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