Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, 1604-1618

By Samuel de Champlain; W. L. Grant | Go to book overview

that we were hungry, he gave us some fish, which we ate, and after our meal I explained to him, through Thomas, our interpreter, the pleasure I had in meeting them, that I had come to this country to assist them in their wars, and that I desired to go still farther to see some other for the same object, at which they were glad and promised me assistance. They showed me their gardens and the fields, where they had maize. Their soil is sandy, for which reason they devote themselves more to hunting than to tillage, unlike the Ochateguins. When they wish to make a piece of land arable, they burn down the trees, which is very easily done, as they are all pines, and filled with rosin. The trees having been burned, they dig up the ground a little, and plant their maize kernel by kernel, like those in Florida. At the time I was there it was only four fingers high.


Chapter 4

Continuation. Arrival at the abode of Tessoüat, and his favorable reception of me. Character of their cemeteries. The savages promise me four canoes for continuing my journey; which they however shortly after refuse. Address of the savages to dissuade me from my undertaking, in which they represent its difficulties. My reply to these objections. Tessoüat accuses my guide of lying, and of not having been where he said he had. The latter maintains his veracity. I urge them to give me canoes. Several refusals. My guide convicted of falsehood, and his confession.

Nibachis had two canoes fitted out, to conduct me to another chief, named Tessoüat, who lived eight leagues from him, on the border of a great lake, through which flows the river which we had left, and which extends northward. Accordingly, we crossed the lake in a west-northwesterly direction, a distance of nearly seven leagues. Landing there, we went a league towards the northeast through a very fine coun-

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